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Dare to care …

This is the post excerpt.

                        Oak Allee at Brookgreen Gardens, Pawleys Island, SC

 

Did you know that 133M Americans live with a Chronic illness? By 2020, that number will exceed 150M. This isn’t my opinion. This is fact. They are our spouses, siblings, parents, grandparents, neighbors and co-workers. They are young and old. No race or social-class is immune. This is America’s health crisis! One that needs far more attention than it is getting. Awareness of this issue is important. Support for those afflicted is an even greater priority. We are in this journey called life, together. Dare to care!

Great Is Thy Faithfulness …

When life is going well, it’s easy to profess one’s faith. I have heard many do so. And, for the record, I do not doubt their sincerity. They are describing their spiritual journey, thus far. But the real test of faith for anyone comes through difficulties in life. Hardship. Suffering.

God promises us many things. He keeps each and every one. But an all-inclusive membership into some “comfort club” isn’t one of them. Christianity isn’t that. It never has been. In Scripture, He actually warns us of the hard times that will eventually find their way into our lives (John 16:33) and of His own discipline (Hebrews 12:7). Christianity isn’t easy. But it is fulfillment in life … a deeper understanding … a walk with God. And, like the trials we face, it transforms us … molds us … into something greater (Philippians 1:6). The Lord sees to that.

 

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     “I have chosen the way of faithfulness …”  — Psalm 119:30 (NIV)

 

Sometimes as we struggle with a Chronic illness, or watch a loved one do so, it’s difficult to see a reason or worthwhile purpose. It’s hard to imagine that any measure of good can ever come from it. Yet, the Apostle Paul tells us that it’s possible for good to come from horrific things (Romans 8). Imagine that.

Our suffering may seem too long, or unnecessary. We may wonder, “Why, Lord?” Doubts may eat away at us. That’s not unusual. We are all human. And fear is a powerful thing. Still, we wait … we pray … we trust. We cling to our faith, because we believe that God keeps His promises. When it would be easy to ask, “Why me?”, we know the more correct question is “Why not me?” No matter how difficult, or how long the road may be, we are not alone. The Lord is with us. We will get through it … each of us … because great is our faithfulness.

 

Reference Links:

*Photo by Samuel Martins on Unsplash.

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MS Awareness Month

It’s March! And most people are thinking of hoops, or St. Pat’s celebrations. They’re scribbling on brackets, or attending a parade. All are good, fun, even exhilarating. But, for a moment, let’s think of something much more serious — Multiple Sclerosis or MS. If you or a loved one is living with this disease, you know how important awareness is. So, let’s spread the word!

But what exactly is Multiple Sclerosis? MS is classified as an autoimmune illness.  In other words, the body’s immune system attacks its own tissues. The cause of this disease is unknown. But there are risk factors that can play a role, i.e. age, sex, family history, some infections, race, climate, vitamin D in-deficiency, smoking, etc. It effects over 2M, worldwide.

MS destroys Myelin (the fatty substance that covers and protects nerve fibers) in the brain and spinal cord. Think of it like the coating that protects an electrical wire. As the Myelin is exposed, messages that travel along that nerve are stymied or blocked all together. The nerve itself may become damaged. Complications can and usually do follow, as the disease progresses its way through periods of ebb and flow.

As with any Chronic illness, there is no cure. Its symptoms can get in the way of daily routine. But patients can still enjoy productive lives with the help of treatment as well as lifestyle changes (including setting limits). And that’s important. We all enjoy contributing our knowledge and talents, even those of us who live with a Chronic illness. A condition, no matter what it is, should not solely define a person. It’s just part of who we are.

March is MS Awareness Month. So, please, spread the word — get involved. Order an Awareness Kit. Take part in an upcoming event near you (some are planned beyond March). Volunteer. Donate. You’ll be glad that you did. The more that people know, the better informed we become as a society. Join the MS team and truly make a difference in the lives of others!

 

Reference Links:

https://mymsaa.org/about-msaa/ms-awareness-month-2019/

https://www.nationalmssociety.org/What-is-MS

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/multiple-sclerosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20350269

https://www.abovems.com/en_us/home/life/around-home.html?cid=PPC-GOOGLE-AM.DTC.AboveMS_DTC_Unbranded_ConditionManagement_Exact.Exact-NA-28810&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI-ZKN-cOB4QIVB56fCh1EbArwEAAYASAAEgJ01fD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/10255/multiple-sclerosis

https://www.nationalmssociety.org/Living-Well-With-MS/Work-and-Home

https://msfocus.org/Get-Involved.aspx

https://msfocus.org/Get-Involved/MS-Awareness-Month/NMSEAM-Awareness-Kits

When The Chickens Come Home To Roost …

To a degree, I think we are all procrastinators. Some of us are worse than others. Many just don’t want to face specific subjects or decisions. And while the latter may make you feel uncomfortable, the alternative is much worse. Emergencies force us to think quickly, make decisions and act (sometimes instinctively as well as boldly). Emergencies happen. That’s life. It could be an accident, or a natural disaster. Perhaps, your health takes an unexpected turn. If you are lucky, you get the opportunity to address those things left undone. If you aren’t, the wake of your emergency becomes a chaotic nightmare for loved ones. No matter your age, or your health, there are a few things that everyone should have just in case this scenario arises. Because sooner or later, the chickens usually do come home to roost.

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To provide some insight into what you need, here’s a checklist to consider:

  • Disaster Checklist, i.e. for coping with tornadoes, hurricanes, blizzards, flooding, etc.
  • A Will
  • A Healthcare POA (Power of Attorney)
  • A Financial POA
  • Designated Caregiver (if needed)
  • End of Life Planning, i.e. a DNR (Do Not  Resuscitate), funeral arrangements, burial, cremation, etc.

Communication is vitally important. This is no time to be shy, or skittish. It is important that your family and friends know your wishes. In the event of an emergency or death, they will have a better idea of how to make decisions on your behalf. Since these decisions aren’t easy ones, the more information that you can provide ahead of time is essential. Make sure they know where to find the above documents, who your attorney is, your physician, your designated caregiver, etc. 

Your needs, following an emergency, can vary. The type of care you may require can, too. These needs can range from the short-term assistance of a caregiver to a permanent skilled-nursing facility. When you discuss these topics with your family, it is easy to let your heart (and theirs) over-rule your mind. Do your best to make logical, practical decisions that will meet your needs and be feasible for family/friends to carry out. For example, if you need a short-term caregiver, you may instantly think of your adult child taking the Family Leave Act. But can he or she financially afford to do so? A better solution might be an In-Home Care Provider.

End of Life issues are difficult. Providing care, during this time, is a challenge for everyone involved — even your doctors. Beyond physical treatment, there are also the psychological and social issues of the patient to consider. These issues often times involve family members as well. Patients, in this stage, are dealing with a lot. Pain often drives their decision-making. Many are suffering from anxiety and/or depression. They are coping — not living. Some are better at this than others. They may long to be in control of their disease, their life, etc. And each, no matter their situation, deserves dignity. It isn’t easy on the patient, or those around him/her.

Last, but not least, remember that emergencies for lack of a better description are emotional roller-coasters. They can bring the best and the worst out, in each one of us –patients as well as loved ones. No two are ever the same. Emergencies vary. Experiences will vary. Patients vary. Needs, treatment, response, side-effects, etc., will too. And relationships also vary. Your sibling’s experience with a parent may not be yours. Parents often times raise children, differently. Age, divorce, abuse, changing social norms, gender, etc., can play a role in this. Still, it is feasible to have siblings with different experiences and feelings. Estrangements happen, for a multitude of reasons. So try to respect each other, at this time. Additional stress and tension won’t help anyone. Seek patience instead of hostility. Work together, if at all possible, for the good of the patient. And if someone needs space … help them to find it. This is both a family journey and a very personal one. For better or worse, both are traveled. May God bless …

 

Reference Links: 

https://estate.findlaw.com/living-will/healthcare-power-of-attorney.html

https://estate.findlaw.com/planning-an-estate/durable-financial-power-of-attorney.html

https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/chronic.html

https://www.healthcentral.com/slideshow/emergency-preparedness-with-chronic-illness

https://www.dol.gov/whd/fmla/

https://getpalliativecare.org/whatis/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1764519/

https://www.familyassets.com/nursing-homes/resources/skilled-nursing-vs-nursing-home

https://www.apa.org/topics/death/end-of-life

https://www.ajmc.com/journals/evidence-based-oncology/2015/april-2015/palliative-and-end-of-life-care-issues-challenges-and-possible-solutions-in-the-united-states-

*Photo by Brianna Santellan on Unsplash

Holistic Approaches To Chronic Illness

Holistic Medicine is a different approach to healing … one that considers all facets of human nature – physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual. Doctors, who embrace this approach, believe that the whole person is made up of interdependent parts and if one part is not working properly, the others will be negatively affected. In other words, the imbalance/s (physical, emotional, or spiritual) will impact their overall health. They believe the key to achieving one’s best health depends upon attaining a proper balance in life — not just focusing on symptoms and writing prescriptions. But can this approach work when treating Chronic illnesses?

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The simple answer is “Yes, it can!” Many Chronic illnesses can be effectively treated and managed with a Holistic approach. A few examples are:

  • Fibromyalgia
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Arthritis
  • Asthma
  • Chronic Pain
  • Kidney Disease
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Auto-Immune
  • Parkinson’s Disease

According to the American Holistic Health Association (AHHA), there are 4 major factors that impact our health: Heredity, Environment, Medical Care and Lifestyle. Of these four, Lifestyle has the most influence — approximately 50%! And lifestyle can be changed! The success stories are endless!

If you or a loved one is interested in learning more about Holistic Medicine, you can visit the American Holistic Health Association’s website at https://ahha.org for additional information, referrals, etc. There is life with a Chronic illness. As a person who lives with more than one of them, I can assure you that the answer isn’t always in a prescription bottle. Sometimes, it comes from where you would least suspect. And optimism is always key to finding the right balance that works for you!

 

Reference Links: 

https://www.webmd.com/balance/guide/what-is-holistic-medicine#1

https://ahha.org/selfhelp-articles/principles-of-holistic-medicine/

http://icpa4kids.org/HPA-Articles/holistic-approach-to-chronic-illness.html

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5847356/

https://www.cnn.com/2014/01/10/health/secrets-pain-free-life/index.html

https://ahha.org/

*Photo by Deniz Altindas on Unsplash

Consider The Caterpillar …

If you’ve been recently diagnosed with a Chronic illness, you probably aren’t thinking about gardens … or flowers … or caterpillars. You may be too overwhelmed to focus on much of anything, except your disease. And that’s understandable.

Often times, the diagnosis falls on a patient like a ton of bricks. You may be angry. Perhaps, you feel inadequate? Scared? Changes to your body, your lifestyle, your abilities, even your mobility, hit with little warning. Pain can be a battle all its own. You weren’t prepared for it. You may even be angry.  And you aren’t alone. 

Approximately, 157M people will be living with a Chronic illness in America by 2020. Millions more, globally. In fact, these illnesses are projected to account for 75% of all deaths worldwide. Chronic illness, or non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are now the biggest health issue that we face. So, proper diagnosis … treatment … and management are vital. And your mindset is equally important. 

 

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“Just when the caterpillar thought the world was over, it became a butterfly.” — Chuang Tzu

 

Many patients develop additional health issues, i.e. anxiety, depression, etc., as their lives become more complicated. Some may even feel as if their life is over — defeated by a condition that they neither wanted or asked for.  If this describes you, please, try to keep your perspective.

Build a Support System that includes your doctor/s, family and friends. Discuss your concerns, openly. Make the necessary changes. Be patient with yourself and your illness. Maintain an optimistic outlook. It does make a difference. And on the tough days … even weeks … remember the fate of the caterpillar. You too can fly, again — even soar — despite your Chronic illness. Change isn’t always a bad thing thing. Often times, it can bring out the very best in each of us!

 

Reference Links:

http://www.nationalhealthcouncil.org/sites/default/files/NHC_Files/Pdf_Files/AboutChronicDisease.pdf

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/12/healthcare-future-multiple-chronic-disease-ncd/

https://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/2_background/en/

https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/optimism-and-your-health

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23510498

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/groups/chronic-illness

*Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

 

 

 

The Benefits Of Chocolate?

Yesterday was Valentine’s Day. A day that often involves flowers and/or sweet indulgences. Some of you may have enjoyed a decadent dessert, after dinner. Others may have gotten a nice box of truffles, as a gift. If this describes you, then take heart. There are benefits to eating chocolate. Healthy ones, at that!

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Cocoa, the key ingredient of chocolate, reduces bad cholesterol (LDL) and can raise your good cholesterol (HDL). This can help to lower your risk of cardiovascular disease. 

The Flavanols found in chocolate can lower blood pressure and improve your overall vascular function. Flavanols are a type of Flavanoid. These are plant-based antioxidants. And antioxidants protect the cells in your body from the damage caused by free radicals. Dark chocolate contains more flavanols (45%-80%) than Milk chocolate (5%-7%). Dark chocolate is also packed with minerals, i.e. zinc, iron, selenium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, etc. So, choose your chocolate wisely!

If eating candy isn’t your thing, consider drinking some hot cocoa. A study conducted at Harvard Medical School found that drinking 2 cups of hot cocoa a day led to increased attention, cognitive functioning, processing, etc. Wow! This can help guard against memory loss. It may even help to prevent illnesses like Alzheimer’s. Adding marshmallows and/or cinnamon is strictly your choice.

I admit, it all sounds too good to be true. But we now have research telling us otherwise. Some research has even linked chocolate consumption to reduced risks of diabetes, stroke and heart attack. Exactly how much of a role it plays is still being studied. One last note, chocolate does contain calories. Too much consumption can lead to weight gain. So, as with other foods and drink, it’s important to eat in moderation (1-2 ounces or 30-60 grams RDA). Here’s having a truffle to your health!   

 

Reference Links:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/healthy-chocolate/faq-20058044

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/cocoa-sweet-treat-brain-201502057676

https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/flavonoid-chocolate-8424.html

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/823208/Chocolate-Alzheimers-Cocoa-boosts-blood-flow-to-the-brain-new-research

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/270272.php

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-fitness/nutrition/chocolate-10-health-reasons-you-should-eat-more-of-it/

https://nccih.nih.gov/health/antioxidants/introduction.htm

*Photo by Kyaw Tun on Unsplash