Seeds & A Healthy Garden …

Spring is in the air, for most of us. With it, there always seems to be that surge of Spring fever that hits this time of year — an opportunity to rid ourselves of the old and bring in the new. We visit garden centers … plant seeds … fertilize soil … and nourish all that grows. Then, we cross our dirty fingers and say a prayer — hoping for a good outcome. Our lives — our bodies — are gardens, too. Remember? Though it would be easier to care for them, on a seasonal basis, it isn’t the best of choices.

If you have a Chronic illness, you know this all too well. It is a 24/7 job just trying to keep up, i.e. symptoms, treatment, doctor’s appointments, routine tests, medications, side-effects, surgery, therapy, etc. Somewhere on that long list, you have to fit in your work schedule … time for your friends and family … even some exercise. You have to avoid too much stress, when your illness seems to literally breed it. You may need to limit, or omit alcohol. And your diet may also need fine-tuning. Some days, it feels pretty overwhelming. Other days, you just want to give up. You may even console yourself by saying, “I can’t do it all!” But if you have a digestive condition like Diverticulitis … managing your diet is key to managing your disease and your life. You have to do better than try. You must prioritize how you eat.

jannis-brandt-107231-unsplash

Diverticulitis is an inflammation, or infection, of the diverticula (small pouches) in the walls of the intestines. Abscesses can develop, as well as perforation of the bowel. The disease may present itself as acute or chronic. In its acute form, Diverticulitis is one or more attacks with periods of stability in-between. Chronic Diverticulitis never clears completely. It is a daily health issue. With time, the disease can cause a variety of complications. Often times, surgery is required.

Exercise, diet and fluid consumption (especially water) play intricate roles in managing Diverticulitis. If you have been diagnosed, you should try to exercise for 30 minutes on most days. It will promote normal bowel function and reduce pressure on your colon. A High-fiber diet will reduce your risk of a disease flare-up. Fiber in your diet absorbs water. This will aid in eliminating wastes from the body.

It was once thought that seeds and nuts aggravated Diverticulitis. A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association has proven this to be untrue. There was no correlation between eating nuts, seeds or popcorn and uncomplicated diverticular disease. There was also no significant association between ingesting fruits with small seeds, i.e. blueberries, strawberries, etc., and complications to Diverticulitis. So, by all means, enjoy such foods.

All of these steps promote a healthier colon. And a healthier colon equates to a happier you. Once you are diagnosed with a Chronic illness, lifestyle changes are often beneficial to your overall well-being. There are no cures. But you can choose to make the most out of every day. And choices matter. Maintain a healthy garden and enjoy living!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.ajronline.org/doi/full/10.2214/AJR.07.3597

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16885698

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diverticulitis/symptoms-causes/syc-20371758

https://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/understanding-diverticulitis-basics

https://www.badgut.org/information-centre/health-nutrition/who-says-you-cant-eat-nuts/

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/diverticulosis-diverticulitis/eating-diet-nutrition

* Photo by Jannis Brandt on Unsplash

Advertisements

Author: livinginthegardenofoptimism

Hi, there! I wear many hats, as most women do. I'm a Christian, wife, mother, writer, volunteer, patient advocate and blogger. My focus is on providing awareness about Chronic illnesses and offering encouragement to those who battle them. Dare to care!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s