Should I Take Generics?

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If you manage to celebrate your 65th birthday, free of any chronic illness, by all means consider yourself lucky. More than half of America’s population is living with at least one chronic condition, i.e. Mental illness, Diabetes, Rheumatoid Arthritis, HIV, Cancer, Epilepsy, Hypertension, Addiction, etc. If you are one of those individuals, then you know how expensive and confusing it can be. Medication isn’t the sole issue, but it is a large part of the equation. And as the cost of medication continues to rise, you feel the pinch on your budget. Frustration. Worry. So, you begin to think about your options. With a chronic illness, you cannot risk doing without your medication. Though, unfortunately, some have resorted to such decisions. But you can consider alternatives. Generics offer a very viable solution.

When a company creates a Brand-name drug, a lot of research goes into its development. Once the FDA gives their approval, a 20-year patent is issued. And the drug goes on the market. When that patent expires, a Generic version can be created. Because it requires less research/development expense, a Generic costs less — usually 30-80% less!

I am not here to promote any specific company, or drug. I am here to inform. What many people do not realize is that a Generic drug is a chemically-equivalent version of a Brand-name drug. The FDA requires that Generics have the same active ingredient, dosage, safety strength, usage directions, quality and performance as the Brand-name drugs they copy. They work in the same way. And, like Brand-name drugs, they are manufactured in FDA-inspected facilities.

There are two types of Generic drugs: Generic Substitution and Therapeutic Exchange. A Generic Substitution drug is the equivalent of the Brand-name drug, on the molecular level. The Therapeutic Exchange is a little different. Think of it as comparing store-brand products with Brand-name products. It is a molecular-related substitute, but not exactly the same.

Generic drugs play a pivotal role in the management and treatment of chronic illnesses. One study estimated that the use of Brand-name drugs for the treatment of blood-pressure, in a non-diabetic patient, can cost up to $52K per year. That same patient, using Generics, spends under $8K per year. Which would you prefer to pay?

Best of all, Generics do work. I have spoken to many people, with a variety of chronic illnesses, who made the decision to switch to Generics. Like myself, they found that the Generic drug performed as well as the Brand-name drug. Health insurers and government programs also approve of their use. In many cases, pharmacies will automatically fill a prescription with the Generic version unless they are instructed to use the Brand-name drug.

All medications, Generic or Brand-name, have side-effects. There is no perfect pill, capsule, injection, etc. Finding the right medication is often a process of trial and error … searching … trying … sometimes trying again … then finding the one that works for you. And a couple of Generics, as with a few Brand-name drugs, have been disappointing. Still, the vast majority of Generics are not only safe … they are very effective!

If you are wondering about the use of Generics, talk to your doctor. Ask questions. Be candid with your concerns. He/She can give you information on the Generics that are available for treating your condition/s. You can also visit the FDA Generic Drug Program on their website. You have a choice. Perhaps, it’s time to consider making it?

 

Reference Links:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161025092655.htm

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/buying-generic-drugs-201607159982

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21734210

http://healthsmart.com/SmarterHealth/GenericVsBrandDrugs.aspx

http://www.berkeleywellness.com/self-care/article/how-good-are-generic-drugs

https://www.fda.gov/Drugs/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/BuyingUsingMedicineSafely/GenericDrugs/ucm167991.htm

*Photo by Pina Messina on Unsplash

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The Healing Power of A Pet

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Those of us who are pet owners know how wonderful they are. We brag on them, dote on them, etc.  Those of us, who are also parents, may even distinguish between our children as “those with fur” and “those without”. Our pets live with us, play with us and travel with us. They comfort — even mourn — with us. They are a member of our family and we love them. But did you know that these adorable pets … with their soulful eyes … precocious personalities … cunning wit … and slobbery kisses … actually have the ability to heal?

The U.S. Dog Registry divides dogs (of any breed) into three categories:

  • Service Dogs help with a function/s for a person with a disability, i.e. Blind, Deaf, PTSD, MS, etc.
  • Emotional Support Dogs help people with emotional problems by providing support and comfort, i.e. Anxiety, Depression and Mood Disorders.
  • Therapy Dogs provide affection and comfort to people in hospitals, nursing homes and assisted living centers. They are often sent, in the wake of horrific events, i.e. the recent mass shooting in Parkland, FL.

But what they all accomplish is that they make a positive impact on the people that they interact with. These pets improve the lives of every human that they touch.

Children with Autism were significantly more engaged, when animal therapy was incorporated into their sessions instead of using the standard approach. The children used more language. They exhibited more social interaction. All positive. All heathful.

Cancer patients have improved from pet therapy, also known as Animal-assisted Therapy or AAT. A session of animal interaction, lasting between 5-15 minutes, provides a welcomed distraction from difficult treatments like chemotherapy and radiation. It brightens their day, lifts their spirits and offers a myriad of benefits overall. In fact, AAT has proven to be so effective time and again for many illnesses that the medical community is embracing the idea more than ever before — regularly including it in patient care.

Seniors, who often live alone, also benefit from owning a pet. A pet can provide mental stimulation, erase loneliness, give them a reason to walk around the block and a companion to do it with. Pet interaction has the ability to lessen, even diminish, overall pain. And many seniors live with chronic illnesses that cause a lot of discomfort.

When we are bonding with a pet, we are in the company of a dear friend — a confidante. As a result, our blood pressure lowers … muscles relax … stress fades. On the chemical level, a pet decreases cortisol in our blood. It can raise levels of the brain chemical dopamine that makes us feel good. We are happier and more positive. And when we reach out … touching their fur … rubbing their back … talking to them … we experience an increase of immunoglobulin A. That antibody boosts our immune system. Hormones like serotonin, oxytocin and prolactin are released, when we are rubbing that fuzzy belly or rolling a tennis ball across the floor. Our mood is lighter. We’re smiling … laughing … enjoying life.

Have you hugged your pet, today? Have you felt the nuzzle of a cold nose against your cheek? Or was it soft purring? We all should be so lucky. That furry companion, who greets us at the door, is actually good for us!

 

 

Reference Links:

https://www.prevention.com/health/healthy-living/healing-power-pets

https://www.curetoday.com/community/mike-verano/2015/12/cancer-and-the-healing-power-of-pets

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/benefits-of-elderly-owning-pets-113294.htm

https://www.uclahealth.org/pac/animal-assisted-therapy

https://www.psychologytoday.com/therapy-types/animal-assisted-therapy

https://www.oncologynurseadvisor.com/from-cancercare/animal-assisted-therapy-enhances-cancer-care/article/372518/

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/in-depth/pet-therapy/art-20046342

* Photo by the author

Clarity In The Garden …

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There are few things that represent clarity better than water. Whether you are admiring a waterfall, a fountain, a koi pond, or the massive ocean, there is something clear … almost pristine … about it. You might even wonder how it can look that way … beautiful, refreshing, sustaining.

God gave nature ecosystems to filtrate its water. If you own a garden pond or fountain, you probably have a filtration system operating to maintain it — freeing the water of muck and algae. He also gave our bodies a good filtration system to eliminate cellular wastes and fluids. That system comes in the form of a pair of organs known as kidneys. But when Chronic Kidney Disease strikes, it can make that filtration very difficult.

CKD, or Chronic Kidney Failure as it is also known, is the gradual loss of kidney functioning. When it reaches an advanced stage, dangerous levels of wastes and fluid build-up in the body. Progression of CKD can lead to End-Stage Kidney Failure which requires regular dialysis or a kidney transplant to sustain life.

Chronic Kidney Disease has a variety of symptoms that may include:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of Appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Sleep Problems
  • Changes In Urination
  • Decreased Mental Sharpness
  • Muscle Cramps
  • Swelling in the feet & ankles
  • Itchy Skin
  • Chest Pain
  • Shortness of Breath
  • Hypertension

Since many of these symptoms can be associated with other medical conditions, it is important to see your doctor if you are experiencing them. A diagnosis usually involves examining family history; the medications a patient may be taking; blood tests; urine tests; Imaging tests; and possibly a kidney biopsy. If Chronic Kidney Disease is present, treatment is based upon the stage that the CKD is in.

Since CKD is a Chronic illness, it’s not leaving. So a patient’s response becomes very pivotal to how the disease progresses. There was life before CKD and now there must be life with it. Lifestyle modifications have shown significant improvement in many CKD patients. Through diet alone, one study showed that patients with CKD reduced their risk of death by 68%! Cigarette smoking, exercise and body mass also play a role. Those CKD patients who do not smoke show a slower progression of the disease. They also have a reduced risk of heart attacks and death. Regular exercise was also associated with a reduced risk of death.

The DASH diet has been approved by many health organizations including the National Kidney Foundation. If you have been diagnosed with CKD and need to lose some weight, it is an excellent option. Studies have already shown that the DASH diet helps to decrease hypertension; lowers a patient’s risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer; as well as reducing the formation of kidney stones. If you have any questions, discuss it with your doctor or contact the National Kidney Foundation.

The DASH diet is simple. It is rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, whole grains, fish, poultry, beans, seeds and nuts. The diet encourages less salt/sodium intake. And it limits sugars/sweets. This isn’t a crash diet, or a fad diet. This is about eating healthier and living better as a result.

Exercise can play a positive role, in the lives of CKD patients. Yet, some choose to avoid it. Hopefully, if you’ve been diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease, you will talk to your doctor about exercise options that can keep you on the move. Aerobic exercise has been shown to increase oxygen consumption, in some patients. There is also evidence that aerobics can improve hypertension, lipid profiles and overall mental health. If you just can’t visualize yourself in an aerobics class, then consider another low-impact option. There are many low-impact exercises that provide beneficial results: Golf, Swimming, Water Aerobics, Walking, Elliptical machines, Kayaking, Hiking, Yoga, etc. The important thing is that you find one that you like and get moving.

Life with Chronic Kidney Disease isn’t easy, but it is possible. What matters most is the kind of gardener that you are. Think about that, for a moment. If you ever seen an unkept garden, you know that it is steadily taken over, i.e. weeds, pests, etc. There is no control. A conscientious gardener stays vigilant … takes the actions that need to be taken, maintains a level of control. As a result, they have a beautiful garden. Our lives are gardens, too. How we live … thrive … and enjoy life … depends upon the kind of garden that we choose to keep!

                         “I Can Do All Things Through Christ Which Strengthens Me.”

 — Philippians 4:13 (KJV)

 

Reference Links:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chronic-kidney-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20354521

https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/tc/stages-of-chronic-kidney-disease-topic-overview

https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/Dash_Diet

https://www.kidney.org/news/lifestyle-modifications-improve-ckd-patient-outcomes

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15974634

* Photo by Jeffrey Workman on Unsplash