The Highs & Lows Of Bipolar Disorder

We all have our moods. The good days and the bad. Chronic illness often contributes to the latter. When we are stiff, in pain, struggling with elevated blood sugar levels, etc., we are down … irritable … and frustrated. But for those living with Bipolar Disorder, moods define their condition.

Contrary to the common misconception, a patient with Bipolar isn’t overly emotional. Instead, he or she experiences long periods of mood that are high-energy and others that are deeply saddening — stifling. These periods or episodes can last, for months. In between, they experience normal mood. These drastic swings are difficult and disruptive, for the patient and those around them. But, like other Chronic illnesses, Bipolar can be managed through medication, therapy and lifestyle changes. 

 

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Bipolar, or manic depression as it is also known, is a mental health condition that effects more than 3M Americans. In 2016, it was estimated that 40M are effected worldwide. Some experience their first episode, during childhood. But it typically begins during late teens or early adulthood. Many patients may go for years, untreated. They may not even be aware that they are sick. This by no means suggests that a patient should ignore their symptoms. In fact, the sooner that he or she is properly diagnosed … the easier it will be to get these symptoms under control and effectively manage their condition.

If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder, there are steps that you can take for better living:

  • Eat healthy choices, i.e. Omega-3 foods. Avoid alcohol and drugs. 
  • Communicate with your Doctor or therapist.
  • Always take your medications as directed.
  • Monitor your symptoms.
  • Stay connected to your Support System, i.e. family, friends, etc. Don’t isolate.
  • Develop a more structured lifestyle.
  • Get some form of exercise. It’s emotionally beneficial. 
  • Limit your stress. 

Remember, our lives are like gardens. None are perfect, but all are beautiful. Give yours the chance to blossom and grow!

 

Reference Links: 

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bipolar-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20355955

https://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/healthadvice/problemsdisorders/bipolardisorder.aspx?theme=mobile

http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/conditions/bipolar-disorder#bipolar%20disorder

https://ourworldindata.org/mental-health

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255)

https://suicideprevention.ca/need-help/

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/bipolar-disorder/living-with-bipolar-disorder.htm

*Photo by Kinga Cichewicz on Unsplash

 

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I’m Gonna Soak-up The Sun …

We have all been warned about too much sun exposure and harmful ultra-violet rays. In the process, awareness and prevention turned into absolute fear for some people. Yet, we rarely hear anyone talk about the benefits of sunshine. And the benefits do exist. The sun IS  healthy. In fact, WHO (World Health Organization) has noted that over 3B people worldwide are possibly suffering from ailments that are the result of very low levels of UVR (Ultraviolet Radiation). These maladies include many Chronic illnesses and musculoskeletal disorders. So whether you currently have a Chronic illness or not, you need to indulge in its warmth. Because moderate sun exposure IS a good thing!

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Personally, I find it difficult to select the best benefit from sun exposure. There are so many. But one of the most significant is Vitamin D. Unlike other vitamins that we need, Vitamin D can be synthesized in the skin through a reaction that is initiated by UVB radiation. Just 30 short minutes of sunlight, while wearing a swimsuit, can release up to 50,000 IU into the body! And Vitamin D plays a helpful role with so many Chronic illnesses, i.e. Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Diabetes, Auto-immune diseases, etc. It is one of the most essential nutrients that we need to maintain good health. 

Another important benefit of sunlight is the positive effect that it has on our mood. It has long been known that higher levels of serotonin equate to having a better mood, i.e. happy, satisfied, calm. Lower levels are linked to depression and anxiety. A medical study, done in Australia, found that our bodies actually have more serotonin on sunny days than on the dreary ones. Hence, the basis for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) a type of Depression. Serotonin is also linked to weight loss. Still, there’s more …

If you suffer with joint pain, then you know that the warmth of the sun is literally soothing to your body. Warmer weather seems to always bring greater mobility and less pain. Would you like to lower your blood pressure? Research has shown that nitric oxide in the top layer of our skin actually reacts to sunlight. This reaction causes blood vessels to widen as the oxide moves into our blood. And the result is a lower BP! Exposure to sunlight has been linked to getting a restful night of sleep, as well. We can all use that. And many skin disorders, i.e. eczema, acne, psoriasis, have a positive response to UV light treatment.

Summer is here, in all its glory. So take advantage of what the sun CAN do for you. Get outside. Use an SPF of 15 or higher. Remember that moderation is imperative. Nobody needs to overdo it, so stay hydrated. Take your MP3 player or a radio … turn-up the volume … enjoy your favorite music. Read a book on the chaise lounge. Go for a walk around the block. Swim a few laps in the pool. Hit a bucket of golf-balls on the driving range. Wiggle your toes in the sand. Have fun. And soak-up the sun!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2290997/

https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/benefits-of-moderate-sun-exposure

http://time.com/4888327/why-sunlight-is-so-good-for-you/

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/news/20021205/unraveling-suns-role-in-depression

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5440113/

* Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash