Do You Need To De-stress?

Is it just me or is life a lot more stressful than it used to be? Nowadays, it seems that everywhere I go I find people who are tired, frustrated, upset, worried, etc. Life can always throw you a curve-ball that is stressful. But when you add a pandemic … stress hits a whole new level. And stress on its own isn’t healthy. In fact, stress worsens most pre-existing or Chronic conditions. If you have been feeling the pressure of stress, you aren’t alone. According to the American Institute of Stress, about 77% of the population regularly suffers from the symptoms of stress.  Let’s talk about that …

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Stress can negatively impact your relationships at school, home and/or work. A bad day at the office somehow leads to an argument with your spouse/partner? Or vice-versa? You know what I’m talking about. Stress can also weaken your immune systems, increase your blood pressure, increase blood sugar levels, increase pain, etc. The more you allow it to consume you, the worse you are going to feel. That’s a given. And that makes you more vulnerable to other things, i.e. anxiety, depression, colds, viruses. Thankfully, we can do things to reduce the stress in our lives.

If you feel that stress is getting the best of you, try these simple yet effective ways to de-stress:

  • Limit Social Media/Broadcast Media. Yes, social media can be fun. Unfortunately, it’s also a stressor for millions. So limit your use of it. Binge-watching news and talk-shows can also have a negative impact. Select one or two reputable news broadcasts or shows, watch them and move on. You want to be informed — NOT stressed-out.
  • Meditation/PrayerIt just takes a few minutes to close your eyes and focus on something positive or calming. Likewise, reading from a devotional or engaging in silent prayer has the same soothing results.
  • Breathing Deeply. For five minutes, sit upright with your eyes closed. Slowly inhale through your nose and exhale through your mouth.
  • Slow Down. Look around you. Admire flowers growing, a butterfly fluttering, etc. Eat slower and enjoy your food. Live in the moment and do so fully. When you focus on your senses, you should feel less tense.
  • Reach Out. Talk to others, face-to-face or on the phone. Share what’s going on with a friend, co-worker, spouse/partner before it becomes a bigger issue. It can provide helpful support and input.
  • Pull-out The Heating-Pad. Just 10 minutes of warmth on your neck and shoulders can allow your body to decompress and ease tension.
  • Laugh Out Loud. Enjoy a good joke or a funny story … at home, in the locker-room, or the break-room. Watch a 30-minute sitcom with your significant other. Laughing lowers your body’s stress hormone (cortisol) and boosts brain chemicals (endorphins) that lighten your mood.
  • Exercise. All forms of exercise, even low-impact ones like yoga and walking, can relax you. It can ease depression and anxiety. 
  • Listen To Music. Soothing music, from classical to nature sounds, can lower your blood pressure and heart-rate. You can even create your favorite playlist for relaxing!
  • Keep A Gratitude Journal. Carry it with you. Set it by your bed and read it every night. Think of the things you are most grateful for, in your life. The people and things that make your life special.

 

Last but not least, realizing that you need to de-stress isn’t a sign of weakness … or age … or illness. It’s a preventative health measure. One that we all can benefit from. So, don’t be reluctant to try it. The healthier that we are, the happier we are. That leads to the more productive we are and so on. And it’s all good. So go for it!

 

 

 

 

Reference Links:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/hope-relationships/201504/6-natural-ways-de-stress

https://www.webmd.com/balance/guide/blissing-out-10-relaxation-techniques-reduce-stress-spot#3

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/stress/art-20046037

https://www.simplypsychology.org/stress-immune.html

https://www.stress.org/daily-life

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/social-media-mental-health-negative-effects-depression-anxiety-addiction-memory-a8307196.html

*Photo by Jared Rice in Unsplash

Chronically Ill In An Outbreak

Coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, is here. If it hasn’t reached your state, province, territory, or nation, odds are that it will arrive soon. If you or a loved one has a Chronic illness, i.e. Cancer, Diabetes, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Asthma, COPD, Heart disease, Lupus, etc., you probably already know that you have a weakened immune system. You’ve probably been told to get a flu shot, take a good vitamin, etc. There’s a reason for that. Because you are chronically ill, you are at a greater risk for colds, flu, viruses, etc., than the general population. That means you are more vulnerable, in this current outbreak. I won’t insult your intelligence by telling you to ignore the news, cross your fingers, or hope for the best. I will encourage you to be proactive. So, let’s focus on that …

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According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), Coronavirus is spread from person to person. It is also believed that people are most contagious, when they are sickest (showing the most symptoms). It may also be possible to contract the virus from infected surfaces or objects.  When you go out, maintain social distances (3 feet or 1 meter) between yourself and anyone who is sneezing or coughing. Wash your hands (for at least 20 seconds). If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Our hands touch many things. So, please, keep yours clean. If possible, use tissues to sneeze or cough into. Then, promptly dispose of the tissue. Good respiratory hygiene is not only helpful to you, but to others who are around you. Stay home if you don’t feel well. That’s a no-brainer. If you think or know that you have been exposed to COVID-19, don’t wait for symptoms to appear … contact your doctor immediately. And if you have a fever, persistent cough, or difficulty breathing … contact your doctor immediately!

Many have rushed to buy face-masks. However, the CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a face-mask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases. Face-masks should be worn by individuals who are exhibiting the symptoms of Coronavirus. This protects others from catching it. Face-masks should also be worn by healthcare providers and caregivers who are in close-contact with Coronavirus patients.

As easy as this sounds, buy some Disinfecting Wipes for use at home and at work. Use them. It only takes a few minutes to wipe down surfaces, doorknobs, etc. Buy some facial tissues for home and work. Use them. Make healthy dietary choices and thoroughly cook meat and eggs. Rest. Wash your hands. Exercise some commonsense and good judgement. Last but note least, manage your Chronic disease.

There are no guarantees with the Coronavirus. We cannot ignore it. Nor can we allow ourselves to be consumed by the fear of something that may never happen. But we can take precautionary steps to help prevent it. And that’s more than a wish — that’s action!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/symptoms.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/transmission.html

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-01/tl-pss_1012920.php

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-51674743

*Photo by Free To Use Sounds on Unsplash