We Need Human Touch …

Most of us don’t put a lot of thought into this subject, but there is much to learn from it.  If you were raised in a family who openly showed affection, you are most likely a hugger. You hug family, friends, new acquaintances, etc. It is a social interaction that is part of your daily life. If you were raised in a family who didn’t easily share affection (by that I mean often or at all), you may not like hugging. You probably don’t even understand why some people are so open to affection. Yet, touch is a basic human interaction. An infant is soothed by it. An adult feels comfort, even joy, from it. And what they are feeling is real. It’s significant. Because we all need human touch — the decent, affectionate kind. It has the ability to relieve us of pain, fear, frustration, etc. It has the power to make us feel loved and appreciated. But how does something like a hug do all that? 

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According to researchers, we all have the ability to communicate many feelings through touch. Physical contact is what distinguishes us from other animals. It is a silent language that needs no words. A mother can cuddle her crying baby, in the night, and the message is clear. The infant knows he/she is secure and their crying ceases. A stranger can go into a natural disaster area and offer a hug to a distraught victim. Again, the message is clear. Help has arrived. That compassion, even from a stranger, can be sensed. And it’s powerful. There is also a difference between a caring touch and an aggressive one. The two categories should never be confused. 

When we offer or receive a caring hug, oxytocin is released in our bodies. This is a “bonding” hormone. It has the ability to reduce stress, lower cortisol levels and increase our sense of trust/security. In fact, in a study conducted by the University of North Carolina, researchers discovered that women who received more hugs from their partners had lower heart rates and blood pressure. That’s healthy! A massage has the ability to relax the body, ease pain and melt away tension. That’s healthy! Even something as simple as eye contact and a pat on the back from a patient’s doctor may boost their survival rate, despite the complex disease they are fighting (University of California research). It may sound too good to be true, but science supports it.

Scientific research actually correlates physical touch with several things:

  • Decreased violence. Less touch as a child will lead to greater violence.
  • Greater Trust. Touch has the ability to bond individuals.
  • Decreased Disease & Stronger Immune Systems. In other words, a healthier you.
  • Greater Learning Engagement. When teachers touch students platonically, it encourages their learning. They are also more likely to speak-up in class.
  • More Non-Sexual Emotional Intimacy. Interpersonal touch has a powerful impact on our emotions. 
  • Stronger Team Dynamics. We touch to initiate and sustain cooperation. Hugs and handshakes increase the chances that a person will treat you “like family”, even if you’ve just met. 
  • Economic Gain. Touch signals safety and trust, i.e. NBA teams whose players touch each other more, win more games.
  • Overall Well-being. Adults need positive human touch to thrive, i.e. hugs, handshakes, a pat on the arm or back, holding hands, cuddling, etc. It is fundamental to our physical, mental and emotion health.

Today, we are even seeing Touch Therapy being used to treat patients. First standardized in the 70’s, scientists are not sure how this technique works. The popular theories are: a) Pain is stored in the body’s cells; b) Think quantum physics. Blood, which contains iron, flows through our bodies and creates an electromagnetic field; c) Good health requires a balanced flow of life energy. And there are many Chronic illnesses that respond to this treatment, i.e. Fibromyalgia, Lupus, Alzheimer’s, Chronic Pain, etc.

Some of us are old enough to remember the social panic that AIDs initially created. People feared that it could be spread by even the simplest forms of human contact. Patients often suffered in near isolation. Until, one day, a certain princess visited an AIDs hospital … and held the hand of patient. No gloves. No mask. Just hand-to-hand touch. Thank you, Diana. You not only helped that patient, you changed the global perception of a disease.

We are all in need of human touch … of its power … its compassion … and its ability to literally make us feel better. Some are starved for that connection. So, stretch out your arms … reach for a friend, a family member, your pet, even a stranger. It’s time that we all embrace a hug for our good health. 

 

Reference Links:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/articles/201303/the-power-touch

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/lifetime-connections/201808/not-everyone-wants-hug

https://www.khca.org/files/2015/10/8-Reasons-Why-We-Need-Human-Touch-More-Than-Ever.pdf

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-mind-body-connection/201309/why-we-all-need-touch-and-be-touched

https://psychcentral.com/blog/the-surprising-psychological-value-of-human-touch/

https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/hands_on_research

https://www.in-mind.org/article/that-human-touch-that-means-so-much-exploring-the-tactile-dimension-of-social-life

https://theweek.com/articles/749384/painnumbing-power-human-touch

https://www.healthline.com/health/haphephobia#symptoms

https://www.mountsinai.org/health-library/treatment/therapeutic-touch

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/magazine-39490507/how-princess-diana-changed-attitudes-to-aids

*Photo by Gus Moretta on Unsplash

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Halloween, Kids & Juvenile Diabetes

It’s October and the leaves are starting to fall from the trees. Cooler air (Thank you, Lord!) has finally arrived. Autumn decorations are everywhere you turn. And, yes, the kids are getting pretty excited about Halloween. But if your child has a health issue like Juvenile Diabetes (T1D), a holiday that’s focused on enormous hauls of candy can literally be dangerous. Still, there are ways to have loads of fun and stay safe. Let’s talk about it …

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Personally, I have struggled with my weight my entire life — up and down the scale. My cousin was diagnosed with T1D, before he even started to school. As adults we began looking for alternatives that might be a source of prevention, for our own children. To date, our efforts have worked!

First of all, don’t focus solely on food especially candy and sweets. This holds true for any holiday and any child. It’s a life-lesson. Yes, Halloween only comes once a year. But that can also be an excuse for Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s, Valentine’s, Easter, etc. So, avoid it. Those excuses add up and they can have negative consequences.

Second, but equally important, is your child’s feelings. Kids with any Chronic illness want to feel “included” — not excluded. They want to feel like everyone else. An easy way to make them feel included is to adopt traditions, even for something like Halloween. These traditions bond your family. They can even be shared with friends. 

So, before the big night, plan a fun-packed evening! You will need someone to watch your front-door, while you’re out. Ask a grandparent, or friend, if they can help for 2-3  hours.

Remember that trick-or-treating is just one part of Halloween. It isn’t the ONLY part. Think traditions, here. You can plan a family-dinner at home. You might even put up some decorations, i.e. balloons, Silly String, a Fog Machine, etc. If possible, get the kids involved. It adds to the excitement. And they’re more likely to eat something, if they have helped prepare it. Cucumber and Hummus sandwiches are a good start. Or maybe a Veggie Skeleton? How about Turkey Chili? Cheeseburger Pasta? Meat’n’Cheese Stromboli? Greek Pizza? These recipes and countless others are Diabetic, easy and kid-friendly. For dessert, add a little autumn fun … bob for apples! 

Now, you’re ready to go trick-or-treating. Remember those jackets, sweaters and Glow sticks. It’s important to limit your area of door-to-door action, i.e. your street, your apartment building, your neighborhood. This alone will reduce your child’s candy haul. You can include Grandma’s house, an Aunt’s house, etc. that are located elsewhere. But set limits from the start and stick to them. This will allow your diabetic child to make the rounds … showing-off his/her costume with their siblings and/or friends. And it will also give you more control over their sugar intake.

The last activity of the evening is the grand finale, i.e. a corn maze, a local haunted house, a hay ride, etc. Whatever you choose will be loads of fun for the entire gang. And it will provide plenty of laughter as well as great memories. The photos, selfies, even video will be worth sharing for days … weeks … even years to come. The bragging rights for you and your children will be equally enjoyable. Anybody and everybody can go door-to-door. Yawn. It equates to the same-old, same-old. You took Halloween to a new level and your family will love it!

Once you are back at home, turn your outdoor lights off and bring in your jack-o-lantern. This signals to all of your children that the evening is winding down for everyone — not just one. The candy eating will start and that’s okay. Allow them to eat a little and save the rest for later (a good practice for kids who aren’t diabetic, too). Get their baths out of the way … and put their pajamas on … then enjoy a DVD … unwind. They’ll be ready for it and you deserve it. Best of all, you’ve started a Halloween tradition that you’ll want to repeat year after year. One that is special, healthy, inclusive, fun and packed with surprises!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/news/20011030/children-diabetes-eat-halloween-candy#1

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/259414/cucumber-hummus-sandwiches/

https://www.tasteofhome.com/healthy-eating/diabetic-recipes/

http://main.diabetes.org/dorg/PDFs/awareness-programs/hhm/what_can_i_eat-fast_food_tips-American_Diabetes_Association.pdf

Easy Greek Pizza

https://www.everydayhealth.com/healthy-halloween-treats-for-kids.aspx

https://www.history.com/news/what-is-bobbing-for-apples

 

 

*Photo by Bekir Donmez on Unsplash

Taking Care Of The Caregiver

When a person is diagnosed with a Chronic illness, focus naturally centers on the patient. This is necessary, for proper treatment and disease management. While most patients have a Support System (or should for best results), many will at some point require a caregiver. This individual, whoever he or she may be, is an essential part of that patient’s life and a vital part of their disease management. They are also, often times, neglected. And that’s an unacceptable risk. Which is why it is imperative to take care of the caregiver …

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Make no mistake, there is nothing easy about the task. Care-giving can be very difficult. It’s mentally, physically and emotionally challenging. I have answered the call, twice in my life. At age 30, I was my father’s caregiver when he was diagnosed with Stage 4 Lung cancer. At 48, I was my mother’s caregiver when she was diagnosed with a very rare cancer (Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Primary to the Bone). Both were extremely different experiences, despite the fact that both of my parents had cancer. Never think, for a moment, that previous experience prepares you to be a caregiver. It does not. Each patient is unique. And each will require different levels of care. When I reflect back on both of my care-giving experiences, I am reminded of a quote from the Charles Dickens novel A Tale Of Two Cities“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” By that, I mean that there were special moments that I will forever hold dear in memory. But there were also times that were heart-wrenching, scary, overwhelming and physically/mentally exhausting. That is care-giving, in a nutshell. Yet, if I had to make the decision again, I would do so. But that’s just me. The responsibility isn’t for everyone. And there is no sin in admitting that. 

If you are a caregiver, or considering the duty, take a moment to reflect upon the demands of the position. And by all means, take preventative action for your own health. No caregiver, regardless of age, is immune to stress … fatigue … or depression. In fact, I would wager that a caregiver is more vulnerable. Why? Because a caregiver naturally puts his/her needs, on the back-burner. As a caregiver, the priority must be the patient that he/she is caring for. So, caregivers often neglect what their bodies need. But if you allow your own health to decline, who is that really helping?

When caring for my dad, his Hospice nurse gave me some priceless advice, “Do something for yourself, because he needs you.” Nancy was so right. It can be once a day, for 30-60 minutes. Or possibly, it’s just once a week. It doesn’t matter which you choose. If you are a caregiver, do something for you, i.e. a massage, a yoga class, a walk around the block, a Bible study, an art class, etc. Indulging in a little “Me Time” may feel a bit selfish, at first. Yet it is vital to keeping you healthy, relaxed and mentally sharp. So, get out and indulge yourself. Then, you can consider these additional tips:

  1. Get some exercise. Even in regular, small increments, it can boost your energy level. Exercise also reduces stress, helps you maintain a healthy weight, etc.
  2. Eat healthy. This too will give you more energy. Eating healthy can help prevent other health problems, too. Also remember to snack healthy.
  3. Don’t Forget How To Laugh. Laughter is good medicine. Try to find some humor in your day-to-day experience as a caregiver. Share a laugh with the loved one in your care (he/she needs joy too)!
  4. Watch-out for depression. The demands placed on you as a caregiver can be difficult and stressful. Stay vigilant. Talk to your doctor, if you think you are experiencing symptoms, i.e. sad, anxious, anger, feeling helpless, irritable, weight loss or gain, sleep issues, difficulty concentrating, etc.
  5. Takin’ Care of Business. Remember that retro phrase? Well, it’s good practice. Balance your checkbook. Pay bills. Work when you need to. Save for a special outing, anniversary, or trip. It’s good for both of you!
  6. Keep Your Dr. appointments. If you’re sick, you won’t be able to do what your loved one needs. So, visit your doctor & dentist regularly. Get your lab-work, or flu shot. Your good health is the fuel that keeps this care-giving engine running!
  7. Optimism is key. Refresh your mind, every day. Yes, you have limitations. We all do. So, let go of that guilt. Acknowledge the job that you’re doing. It’s special and important. Like other things, care-giving has a learning-curve. You will get there.
  8. Stay connected. Use the phone, internet, newspaper, etc. But, by all means, stay connected to the outside world & what is happening around you.

Last, but not least, if you need help … ask for it! Call a family-member or friend and ask for some assistance. Talk to your doctor and your loved one. If the patient’s level of care becomes too extensive, it could be time to consider hiring a professional caregiver. If you need to work, consider utilizing Adult Day-care options in your area. Just remember … you aren’t alone. There are many who are willing to offer ideas and alternatives. Don’t be afraid to seek their advice. Take care of your loved one — and you!

 

 

Reference Links:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/caregiver-stress/art-20044784

https://caregiveraction.org/resources/10-tips-family-caregivers

https://www.cancer.net/coping-with-cancer/caring-loved-one/tips-being-successful-caregiver

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/taking-care-yourself-tips-caregivers

https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/caregiver-support/top-10-caregiver-tips-for-staying-healthy-and-active

Adult Day Care Services

https://www.rwjf.org/en/library/articles-and-news/2003/04/the-role-of-adult-day-services.html

https://www.webmd.com/depression/guide/depression-symptoms-causes#1

*Photo by James Hose, Jr., on Unsplash

Make Mine Tea, Please

Most of us are familiar with the old cliche “You are what you eat”. Well, that also holds true for what you drink. And depending upon your choices, the effects can be good or bad. For centuries, tea has been recognized for its ability to soothe, refresh and heal. Have you tried it?

 

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Personally, I like to drink tea hot or cold. Nothing comforts a sore throat like a warm cup of tea that’s been sweetened with a little honey. Likewise, there are few things that can refresh you like a cold, glass of tea. But the benefits extend far beyond this. Many Chronic illnesses can be positively influenced by this age-old drink.

Studies have shown that specific teas may help with cancer, heart disease, diabetes, obesity, Parkinson’s, etc. Tea, of any blend, has less caffeine than colas or coffee. Think of it this way: Tea IS a good choice! And brewed is better than bottled. If you want to focus on using a specific tea, the following will help to get you started:

  • Green tea has a high level of an antioxidant known as EGCG. This may hinder the growth of bladder, breast, lung, stomach, pancreatic and colon cancers. It can also reduce the clogging of arteries, burn fat, reduce cholesterol and lower the risk of neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Stroke.
  • White tea has the most powerful anticancer properties of any processed tea.
  • Oolong tea has antioxidants that will lower bad cholesterol or LDL. It has also been marketed as a weight-loss supplement. However, scientific studies to support the latter are not available. 
  • Black tea, which includes Pu-erh tea, can help with weight loss, reduce cholesterol and lung health. Black tea also contains the highest amount of caffeine.
  • Herbal teas (Chamomile, Ginger, Ginseng, Jasmine, Rosehip, Mint, Hibiscus, Echinacea and Rooibos) have been shown to help a variety of illnesses, from sore throat to hypertension.

Instant teas, while convenient, contain more sugars and artificial sweeteners. So, please, read the label … buy a tea-kettle … and brew. You can brew iced tea by filling a pitcher half-full with hot water. Add your large tea-bag (family-size) and let it do its thing for about 22 minutes. Remove the bag and add your preferred sweetener. Then, add cold water until pitcher is full and refrigerate. No stove or tea-kettle required. This isn’t difficult. Nor does it take a lot of time. It’s also incredibly inexpensive compared to other beverage choices that are on the market.

It should be noted that the FDA has issued warnings about so-called “dieter’s teas”. These tea blends contain plant-derived laxatives. They are more of a marketing scam than a health benefit. The FDA has also issued warnings about taking many supplements, i.e. Comfrey, Willow bark, Germander, Lobelia and Chaparral. Tea, as with other things that we consume (from farm to table), can be tainted or misleading. The more that you know, the wiser you become as a consumer. 

Last, but not least, there are many brands of tea on the market today. For a cup of hot tea, I’m partial to Celestial Seasonings (the Mandarin Orange Spice is my absolute favorite). For iced tea, it’s hard to beat Lipton. If you are interested in trying tea but uncertain of what blend to drink … ask your doctor or a nutritionist. When we consume healthy, we are healthier. That’s just a no-brainer. So, enjoy some tea and reap the rewards!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.eatright.org/health/wellness/preventing-illness/the-health-benefits-of-tea

https://www.medicinenet.com/sore_throat_home_remedies_and_treatment/article.htm

https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/tea-types-and-their-health-benefits#2

https://specialtyteaalliance.org/world-of-tea/us-grown-tea/

https://www.aol.com/article/2016/03/24/why-weight-loss-tea-is-the-biggest-scam-on-instagram/21333062/

14 Best Green Tea Brands in 2019

*Photo by Tina Dawson on Unsplash

Your Privacy, Your Chronic Illness & Your Job

Don’t let anyone fool you. When you live with a Chronic illness, you do a lot of thinking. You make a lot of decisions. Cool tee shirt aside, life really is filled with tough choices. And if you haven’t juggled many in your past, a Chronic illness will change that quickly. Which doctor do you trust? Which treatment do you choose? Which medication/s will work best? And aside from these obvious questions, you also wonder about your privacy. Yes, HIPAA is a great thing. And there are similar protections in place abroad, i.e. PIPEDA, Directive on Data Protection. But, outside of medical community, who do you share your illness with? Who do you entrust with that personal information? How much is, well, too much?

 

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Let’s start with your family and close friends. They are usually part of your support system. And, yes, they need to know about your diagnosis. Especially, those who are closest to you. A strong support system will help you to manage your condition more effectively. Providing them with additional information is also helpful, i.e. the name of your doctor, your medications, etc. Next, is your workplace. And that’s an entirely different animal!

Legally, you are not required to disclose a Chronic illness to your employer. An employer hires you to do a job. If you are capable of doing that job, you are fulfilling your end of the deal. This also holds true, if you are seeking employment. On the other hand, some say the added stress of trying to conceal their condition was/is frustrating and difficult. There is no wrong answer, here. It really depends on what you are comfortable with. You may choose to discuss your illness with HR, but not your co-workers. That too is okay. Nobody wants to be gossip fodder for the break-room. This is about your health and your privacy.

Many patients learn what their group health plans offer, after they have been diagnosed. Better late than never, I guess. When you are living with good health, you are truly experiencing a blessing. But knowing your health coverage is also the peace of mind that will help you to sleep at night. Take a few minutes to actually get those facts. And if you have never taken the time to acquaint yourself with Labor Law, here are two key pieces of legislation to start with: The Family Medical Leave Act and the Americans With Disabilities Act. Living with a Chronic illness, you may need to use one or both at some point. Understanding them is crucial. Sadly, disability discrimination still exists in our society. And many Chronic illnesses can lead to a disability. If you ever feel your employer is harassing you, or is discriminating against you, due to your Chronic illness … you can contact the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or EEOC. Know your rights. They exist to protect you.

Last, but not least, go out and LIVE! Don’t allow your disease to define you. It isn’t what you are, it is just a part of who you are. So, make plans. Work. Travel. Finish Grad School. Buy a home. Start a family. Set goals. Dare to dream. The choices are waiting and they’re all yours!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/security/laws-regulations/index.html

https://www.atlantic.net/hipaa-compliant-hosting/beyond-hipaa-international-health-data-protection-europe-canada/

https://www.dol.gov/whd/fmla/

https://www.ada.gov/2010_regs.htm

https://www.eeoc.gov/facts/ada18.html

https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm

*Photo by Jose Llamas on Unsplash

 

 

An Apple A Day …

Remember the old Welsh proverb that this title alludes to? Well, as it turns out, that saying is more fact than cliche. Apples are healthy for us. In fact, many research studies suggest that apples may be one of the healthiest foods you can eat! And they taste so incredibly good too!

 

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Apples come in over 2,000 varieties, ranging from sweet to sour in taste. So there is something for everyone, no matter your preference. A serving, or one medium-sized apple, contains about 95-100 calories. It also contains 0 gram fat, 1 gram protein, 25 grams carbohydrate, 19 grams sugar (naturally occurring), and 3 grams fiber. Apples are also low in sodium and cholesterol. And they provide a good source of vitamin C as well as fiber. If you are on the AIP diet, also known as the Autoimmune Protocol diet, for  Psoriasis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, or Lupus, you’re probably already eating apples. But they can also help patients with other Chronic illnesses, i.e. Heart disease, specific Cancers, Alzheimer’s disease, Dementia, Obesity, Diabetes, Stroke, etc. Imagine that!

You’ll also find an endless array of recipes (including low-carb) available online, in cooking magazines and cook-books, to help you incorporate apples into your weekly menu. Or you can enjoy one, right from the fruit-bowl. Maybe, a serving of apple juice with breakfast? My personal favorite is applesauce. Sometimes, simple is the best. So, by all means, indulge yourself. It’s September. The apples are fresh and bountiful. It’s time to enjoy them and reap the benefits of better health! 

 

Reference Links:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/267290.php

https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/benefits-apples#1

Apples

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/health-benefits-apples

https://healingautoimmune.com/aip-food-list

36 Easy AIP Recipes That Won’t Stress You Out

https://www.cookinglight.com/food/in-season/healthy-apple-recipes?

https://www.countryliving.com/food-drinks/g4650/healthy-apple-recipes/

*Photo by Shelley Pauls on Unsplash