Choose Joy …

It’s funny how little things can emotionally move you. When I was very young, my mother took me on a trip to the local garden center. She said that a Dutch girl (such as myself) needed to start appreciating Dutch flowers. We picked out various bulbs — Tulip, Crocus and Hyacinth. Then, we went home to plant them. It was my first real hands-on experience, with gardening — filled with ancestry, excitement, dirt, anticipation, and beautiful results. In the decades long since, I’ve always had and admired Dutch flowers. Whenever I see them in bloom, no matter where it is, I have to pause to just look at them. And I always smile. It gives me joy.

Recently, I was doing some updates around the house. I wasn’t really looking for a wall plaque, but it found me. It was simple, in design — a bit rustic — painted with wildflowers and butterflies. Yet, its message leaped out at me: “Let it go … Choose joy”. Like those Dutch flowers, it made me smile. It literally uplifted me, if only for a few moments. Need I say, I bought the plaque? And I hung it where it can be seen, first thing, every day. I did this as a reminder to myself to choose joy — to live as happily as I can. And to let go of the negative.

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Faith teaches us that joy is an emotion and a “fruit of the Spirit” (Galatians 5:22-23). That it is a matter of habit and virtue. And that it can be commanded. I’ve never professed to being a Divinity major. My walk in faith is purely based on my experiences in life. But in my humble opinion, God didn’t place us on Earth to be miserable. Scripture teaches us that “A joyful heart is good medicine …” (Proverbs 17:22). Remarkably, there are actually scientific studies to support this.

When we are happy, or joyful, our hearts are healthier. Our stress is lessened. Aches and pains diminish. Our immune systems grow stronger. And our lives are lengthened. Think about that, for a moment.

Psychology teaches us that happiness and joy aren’t exactly the same. Happiness is a vague emotion. It means different things to different people. And that it’s temporary, in duration. Yet, all agree that it is positive. Joy is also positive — possibly more powerful. But Joy, they contend, is like a belief. It is with us, for the long haul. Even when life becomes difficult, joy can find a way to comfort and uplift us.

There are ways to feel more joy and happiness, in your daily life:

  •  Choose to smile. You can make a conscious decision, each day, to have a good day.
  • Try Prayer or Meditation. It soothes the mind and soul. Relieves stress. Comforts.
  • Practice Positive Thinking. Acknowledge the simple things that bring you joy.
  • Be Grateful. Often times, joy/happiness is increased by recognizing the people & things that we already have.
  • Be More Active. Random acts of kindness don’t require Olympic training. Yet, they are fulfilling and inspiring. Try volunteering for a cause you believe in. You will feel joy, as a result of your involvement.

Society often times bombards us with negative things. But each of us has the power to choose. We don’t have to accept every negative that surrounds us. We can learn to let go and choose joy!

 

Reference links:

https://faith.yale.edu/joy/virtues

https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/six_ways_happiness_is_good_for_your_health

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/magazine/happiness-stress-heart-disease/

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/nov/03/why-does-happiness-matter

https://healthpsychology.org/is-there-a-relationship-between-happiness-and-joy/

https://ideapod.com/psychologist-explains-best-way-change-thinking-negative-positive/

* Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash.

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The Garden of Optimism: What is this place?

Did you ever find yourself wondering how life managed to lead, or drag, you down a certain path? Well, such is my case. When we find ourselves in such a predicament, we usually know how we got there. But sometimes we aren’t too eager to admit it. Still, there are times when life leads us into the middle of uncharted territory. Our reaction depends upon the circumstances, our perception of them and our willingness to take on the challenge. For me, personally, I am humbled and flabbergasted.

Throughout my entire life, I have always felt a strong sense of service — volunteering with various organizations, my church and within the community. But no one would have predicted that I’d become a blogger — including me. I’m not the most tech savvy person on Earth. I freely admit that. Still, God did provide me with a gift for words. One that I’m abundantly grateful for. And He molded me with a very tenacious spirit. So, why now? Why bother?

In all honesty, I have felt a calling. Divine, as from the Lord, but not in the pastoral sense. Persistent. Urging me. Whispering to my conscience. Telling me, of all people, that I need to reach out and do this (Matthew 5:16 NIV). I need to serve (1 Peter 4:10 NIV) others. I need to help them — to become their voice. So, here I am — a Patient Advocate.

I’m not a medical professional, though I’ve seen more than my share of them. I hold no degree in Divinity. My credentials are from personal experience. And, unfortunately, this is subject-matter that I know all too well. I have lived it, for decades.

By now, if you’re still with me, you may be wondering where all of this is going. Patience, Sweet pea. I’m a Southern gal. We sometimes ramble like ivy on an arbor, but we eventually get to the point …

Mine is that our lives are like gardens. For a moment, consider the similarities. There are beautiful, bountiful years. And there are meager harvests. All of the usual things can make growing difficult. The rocks. The lousy soil. Even the daily grind. Too much heat, or stress, is harsh on a garden. And it’s harsh on us, too. The rain, whether in drops or tears, can wash away our plants … our plans … our dreams … even our deepest desires. Then, there are the things that we least suspect. The ones that we never wanted. The ones that, we so often told ourselves, only happened to other people. And our gardens are never the same …

This blog is a place of refuge and support. It is devoted to those who are living with chronic illnesses and their loved ones. I understand what you are feeling. Your garden and mine share common ground. This is about accepting that no garden is perfect, but all have beauty and purpose. It’s about realizing the potential of your garden — finding it. This is about living, each and every day to the fullest in His light (1 John 1:5 NIV). It’s about enjoying the sun on our face and the blooms that we find. It’s about allowing our bodies and souls to dance. Yes, dance — even in the rain. Come … sit a spell (as we say down South) … browse the pages of this site (there’s more than one). Let’s talk. You aren’t alone.

 

Blessings,

Julia

 

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* Photo by Kaeyla McGee on Unsplash