Chronically Ill In An Outbreak

Coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, is here. If it hasn’t reached your state, province, territory, or nation, odds are that it will arrive soon. If you or a loved one has a Chronic illness, i.e. Cancer, Diabetes, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Asthma, COPD, Heart disease, Lupus, etc., you probably already know that you have a weakened immune system. You’ve probably been told to get a flu shot, take a good vitamin, etc. There’s a reason for that. Because you are chronically ill, you are at a greater risk for colds, flu, viruses, etc., than the general population. That means you are more vulnerable, in this current outbreak. I won’t insult your intelligence by telling you to ignore the news, cross your fingers, or hope for the best. I will encourage you to be proactive. So, let’s focus on that …

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According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), Coronavirus is spread from person to person. It is also believed that people are most contagious, when they are sickest (showing the most symptoms). It may also be possible to contract the virus from infected surfaces or objects.  When you go out, maintain social distances (3 feet or 1 meter) between yourself and anyone who is sneezing or coughing. Wash your hands (for at least 20 seconds). If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Our hands touch many things. So, please, keep yours clean. If possible, use tissues to sneeze or cough into. Then, promptly dispose of the tissue. Good respiratory hygiene is not only helpful to you, but to others who are around you. Stay home if you don’t feel well. That’s a no-brainer. If you think or know that you have been exposed to COVID-19, don’t wait for symptoms to appear … contact your doctor immediately. And if you have a fever, persistent cough, or difficulty breathing … contact your doctor immediately!

Many have rushed to buy face-masks. However, the CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a face-mask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases. Face-masks should be worn by individuals who are exhibiting the symptoms of Coronavirus. This protects others from catching it. Face-masks should also be worn by healthcare providers and caregivers who are in close-contact with Coronavirus patients.

As easy as this sounds, buy some Disinfecting Wipes for use at home and at work. Use them. It only takes a few minutes to wipe down surfaces, doorknobs, etc. Buy some facial tissues for home and work. Use them. Make healthy dietary choices and thoroughly cook meat and eggs. Rest. Wash your hands. Exercise some commonsense and good judgement. Last but note least, manage your Chronic disease.

There are no guarantees with the Coronavirus. We cannot ignore it. Nor can we allow ourselves to be consumed by the fear of something that may never happen. But we can take precautionary steps to help prevent it. And that’s more than a wish — that’s action!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/symptoms.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/transmission.html

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-01/tl-pss_1012920.php

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-51674743

*Photo by Free To Use Sounds on Unsplash

February Is For The Heart

Yes, Valentine’s is approaching … paper hearts, roses, cards, candy, nice dinners, flashy bling and all. But it’s also American Heart Month. So, this month, we are going to focus on heart health. Why? Because, fun and games aside, Cupid can’t do anything for your physical well-being. Awareness, on the other hand, can literally save lives!

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Heart disease can happen to anyone — even children. According to data from the CDC, approximately 1% (40,000) of babies born each year have a Congenital Heart Defect (CHD). And 25% of these are critical. Others surface, during childhood or teen years. Some of the most common heart conditions in children are listed as either “congenital” (present from birth) or “acquired” (developed after birth). Some of these conditions are hereditary. And they require special healthcare needs.

If your child was born healthy, you want that good health to continue into adulthood. The best way to achieve that is by teaching healthy habits, now. Here are some great tips for starting:

  • Introduce your child to healthy eating, i.e. set mealtimes, limit snacking, keep junk food out of the house, eat family dinners, and shop/cook with your kids.
  • Encourage fun physical activity.
  • Teach the dangers of smoking & vaping, early.
  • Teach them how to manage their stress.
  • Schedule regular medical exams for your child with his/her pediatrician.

Last but not least, remember that lifestyle risk factors can have a negative impact on the health of your child/teen and you, i.e. obesity, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, smoking, vaping, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. There is a direct relationship between these risks and developing heart disease. Medical research has the statistics to prove it. And there is no better role-model than you. So, teach them well!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/heartdefects/data.html

http://www.secondscount.org/pediatric-center/conditions-children#.XjHvMo7YrnE

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/heartdefects/features/children-heart-conditions-special-care.html

https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=prevention-of-heart-disease-starts-in-childhood-1-2073

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/140/5/e20172607

https://www.ottawaheart.ca/heart-condition/inherited-cardiac-conditions-genetic-disorders

https://www.acc.org/about-acc/press-releases/2019/03/07/10/03/ecigarettes-linked-to-heart-attacks-coronary-artery-disease-and-depression

https://blog.connectionsacademy.com/teach_kids_heart_healthy_habits/

*Photo by Anna Kolosyuk on Unsplash

 

 

On A Cold, Winter’s Night …

If you look on the calendar, winter is almost here. But for many, one glance at the thermometer says winter has already arrived. They can literally feel it. Cold weather equates to aches, pains and other issues. Exactly how or why this happens is still somewhat of a mystery. But scientists know enough to have key pieces of the puzzle in place. The main theory is that Barometric pressure ( the pressure of the air) can and does affect the joints. Arthritis patients know this all too well. But seasonal weather can affect more than muscles and joints. Many Chronic illnesses are vulnerable. Your blood pressure is higher in the winter. Why? Cold temperatures narrow your blood vessels. Migraines can also be triggered by extreme temperatures (hot or cold). And the list goes on …

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Back in 2007, a Tufts University study found that a 10-degree drop in temperature corresponded with increased Arthritis pain. Imagine, for a moment, what a 20-30 degree drop feels like. Ouch! 

If you or a loved one suffer from weather changes, there are some things that you can do to manage your condition. Thankfully, these tips aren’t difficult:

  • Talk to your doctor about seasonal changes in your disease.
  • Avoid becoming a couch-potato. Exercise actually boosts your body’s production of synovial fluid. That keeps your joints lubricated & feeling good.
  • Stay warm. Remember your coat, gloves, hat, etc., whenever you go outside. And consider treating yourself indoors, too.  Flannel sheets & a heating-pad are always comfy!
  • Eat an anti-inflammatory diet.
  • Make sure to get enough Vitamin D, daily.
  • Consider dropping some weight. Just one pound lost eliminates 4 pounds of pressure from your knees!
  • Treat yourself to a massage. It alleviates pain and stress. 

Last, but not least, don’t let the cold of a winter day or night get you down. Address your symptoms and maintain your optimism. The weather can be frightful (yes, a certain holiday song is rolling around in my head), but there are tried and true ways to get through the season with minimal hardship. I believe it starts now, before the pain is overwhelming and your mobility is hampered. So, please, don’t ignore what your body is saying to you. Don’t assume that it won’t happen “this year”. Take a proactive approach to your health and well-being. You’ll be glad that you did!

 

 

Reference Links:

https://www.webmd.com/pain-management/weather-and-joint-pain#1

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326884.php#3

https://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/tools-resources/weather/

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/health-matters/201410/does-rain-cause-pain-and-what-do-about-it

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/expert-answers/blood-pressure/faq-20058250

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/migraine-headache/expert-answers/migraine-headache/faq-20058505

https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/pain-and-changes-in-weather-am-i-alone/

https://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/treatments/natural/other-therapies/massage/massage-benefits.php

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/foods-that-fight-inflammation

https://www.fishertitus.org/health/winter-joint-pain-relief-tips

*Photo by Nicholas Selman on Unsplash