Your Privacy, Your Chronic Illness & Your Job

Don’t let anyone fool you. When you live with a Chronic illness, you do a lot of thinking. You make a lot of decisions. Cool tee shirt aside, life really is filled with tough choices. And if you haven’t juggled many in your past, a Chronic illness will change that quickly. Which doctor do you trust? Which treatment do you choose? Which medication/s will work best? And aside from these obvious questions, you also wonder about your privacy. Yes, HIPAA is a great thing. And there are similar protections in place abroad, i.e. PIPEDA, Directive on Data Protection. But, outside of medical community, who do you share your illness with? Who do you entrust with that personal information? How much is, well, too much?

 

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Let’s start with your family and close friends. They are usually part of your support system. And, yes, they need to know about your diagnosis. Especially, those who are closest to you. A strong support system will help you to manage your condition more effectively. Providing them with additional information is also helpful, i.e. the name of your doctor, your medications, etc. Next, is your workplace. And that’s an entirely different animal!

Legally, you are not required to disclose a Chronic illness to your employer. An employer hires you to do a job. If you are capable of doing that job, you are fulfilling your end of the deal. This also holds true, if you are seeking employment. On the other hand, some say the added stress of trying to conceal their condition was/is frustrating and difficult. There is no wrong answer, here. It really depends on what you are comfortable with. You may choose to discuss your illness with HR, but not your co-workers. That too is okay. Nobody wants to be gossip fodder for the break-room. This is about your health and your privacy.

Many patients learn what their group health plans offer, after they have been diagnosed. Better late than never, I guess. When you are living with good health, you are truly experiencing a blessing. But knowing your health coverage is also the peace of mind that will help you to sleep at night. Take a few minutes to actually get those facts. And if you have never taken the time to acquaint yourself with Labor Law, here are two key pieces of legislation to start with: The Family Medical Leave Act and the Americans With Disabilities Act. Living with a Chronic illness, you may need to use one or both at some point. Understanding them is crucial. Sadly, disability discrimination still exists in our society. And many Chronic illnesses can lead to a disability. If you ever feel your employer is harassing you, or is discriminating against you, due to your Chronic illness … you can contact the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or EEOC. Know your rights. They exist to protect you.

Last, but not least, go out and LIVE! Don’t allow your disease to define you. It isn’t what you are, it is just a part of who you are. So, make plans. Work. Travel. Finish Grad School. Buy a home. Start a family. Set goals. Dare to dream. The choices are waiting and they’re all yours!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/security/laws-regulations/index.html

https://www.atlantic.net/hipaa-compliant-hosting/beyond-hipaa-international-health-data-protection-europe-canada/

https://www.dol.gov/whd/fmla/

https://www.ada.gov/2010_regs.htm

https://www.eeoc.gov/facts/ada18.html

https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm

*Photo by Jose Llamas on Unsplash

 

 

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A Primer: Packing A Healthy Lunch

It’s August already. How in the heck did that happen? While many of us are trying to squeeze the last precious moments out of summer, others are already dreading that ritual of packing a lunch. Eating healthy should be everyone’s priority. But the flesh is weak, especially around foods we ought to limit eating. If you think this is a post about packing a child’s lunch, you’re only half right. Many adults also pack a lunch. Sadly, 50% of American adults skip lunch altogether. They opt to snack, instead. In fact, 44% confess to having a snack-drawer at work. And snacking usually leads to unhealthy habits, difficulty maintaining or losing weight, exhaustion, even premature aging. For those young and old, who live with a Chronic illness, fast-food and snacking can make managing your disease much harder. Who needs that? So, let’s talk healthy lunches that are easy to make and delicious too!

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Starting with the kids … if you feel your child’s school offers healthy choices, then the cafeteria may not be a bad idea. But before you make any assumptions, remember that you know your child best. You know what he or she will eat. You know what temptations they easily fall for. And you probably have a general idea of the school’s menu. Now, ask yourself a couple of questions: Are there healthy options for my child? Will he/she make those choices? If you respond emphatically with a “No!” to either question, it’s probably best to pack a lunch from home. It’s also important that your child understands why you are doing it. Think of this as a life lesson that will help them for years to come.

Some great lunchbox choices for kids are:

  • Fresh or Dried Fruit
  • Crunchy Veggies
  • A Meat or protein food, i.e. sliced meat, a chicken-leg, hard-boiled egg, etc.
  • Remember dairy, i.e. cheese, yogurt and milk.
  • A starchy food like, i.e. bread, roll, pita, fruit breads, or crackers.
  • A bottle of water is always appreciated.

If you are packing a lunch for yourself or your spouse/partner consider these:

  • The cold cut sandwich that always hits the spot.
  • Your favorite salad (Like kids we benefit from fruit & veggies).
  • A quesadilla.
  • Maybe, a rice bowl.
  • Hummus with a few pita chips.
  • Cheese, cottage cheese, or yogurt.
  •  Some rotisserie chicken and vegetables.
  • Soup (Remember that canned is high in sodium).
  • Quiche
  • A bottle water works for you, too.

I know. I know. It sounds hard. You’ve already got a zillion things to do. But if you just think about it, packing these lunches can get a lot easier. For example, left-overs can easily be used in a lunch. Recruiting the kids to help you “shop” for ideas is teaching them and encouraging good choices. And a well-stocked pantry takes a lot of frustration and time out of packing. If the healthy side of it doesn’t appeal to your spouse/partner, try the more practical angle. How much do you spend on lunch at a restaurant? Now, multiply that amount by five days a week. Then, 52 weeks in the year. Wow! It adds up. Packed lunches are less expensive and that savings can be used for other things. In other words, you can eat healthier and have a reward for doing it! Now, that’s what I call living well!

 

Reference Links:

https://nypost.com/2018/08/30/half-of-us-workers-dont-feel-like-they-can-take-a-real-lunch-break/

https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/lunch-box-tips

http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/food-tips/quick-meal-ideas/quick-lunch-ideas.html

https://www.bonappetit.com/story/100-lunch-ideas

https://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/a27504997/healthy-meal-prep-work-lunches/

https://money.howstuffworks.com/personal-finance/budgeting/how-much-cheaper-to-pack-lunch.htm

*Photo by Mae Mu on Unsplash

 

 

More Than A Headache: A Migraine

Headaches, like the common cold, happen. We have all had them, at one time or another. But a Migraine isn’t your garden-variety headache. It’s much worse. In fact, it’s a form of Chronic Illness. Approximately, 1 in every 4 American households has a member who suffers from them. Globally, Migraines are ranked as the third most prevalent illness — effecting one billion people. And the impact that this neurological disease has on patients is real. It’s more than a headache. It’s a constant battle that requires treatment, patience and perseverance.

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Migraines usually begin in childhood, adolescence, or young adulthood. When one strikes, they progress through stages, i.e. Prodrome, Aura, Attack, Post-Drome. The symptoms of each stage are distinctive. But not every patient will experience all four stages. If you or a loved one have been diagnosed, you know the symptoms all too well:

  • Prodrome begins 24-48 hours before the migraine occurs. During this time, patients may experience constipation, moodiness, food cravings, neck stiffness, increased thirst and urination, or frequent yawning.
  • Aura can occur before and during migraines. They are reversible symptoms of the nervous system and usually visual in nature, i.e. seeing bright spots, flashes of light, or experiencing vision loss. But Auras can also include other disturbances, i.e. sensations in the arms and legs, weakness/numbness in the face or on one side of the body, difficulty speaking, hearing noises, or uncontrollable jerking movements. These begin gradually and build over several minutes.
  • The Attack, or Migraine itself, lasts from four to 72 hours if left untreated. Frequency varies from one patient to the next. For some, the occurrence is seldom. For others, it may be numerous attacks each month. During this stage, patients experience severe pain (usually on one side of their head). Some patients say that the pain is all over their head. They are sensitive to light, smells, even touch, during this stage. Nausea and vomiting are also common.
  • Post-Drome  is the time following the attack. Typically, it lasts from an hour to a day in length. The patient often feels drained of energy. Others may feel relief that the attack is finally over. Confusion is also common. And many patients report that any sudden head movement brings back pain, temporarily. 

Living with Migraine is difficult. This neurological disease is very incapacitating. In fact, about 90% of patients are unable to work, or function normally, during an episode. Depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances are also common with Migraine patients. And many have a family medical history of the illness. Maintaining a job, let alone building a career, is a challenge. As many as 20% of Migraine sufferers become disabled. All of these factors also impact daily living and relationships.

Despite the strides that are made yearly in medicine, Migraine remains a very misunderstood disease that is often undiagnosed and untreated. Most patients suffer in silence. This could be the result of escalating healthcare costs, limited access to medical care, or too little (if any) support at home/work. Another sad fact to consider is that many patients (25%) would actually benefit from preventative treatment, but only a few (12%) seek it. We need to change that and we can!

If you or a loved one has Migraines, or you suspect that you do, then it’s time to see a doctor and get help. You have options, from holistic treatment to medication. Put an end, or at least limit, your suffering. It’s time to start living, again!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/migraine-headache/symptoms-causes/syc-20360201

Migraine Facts

Living with Migraine

*Photo by Anh Nguyen on Unsplash